Section I - Analytical Skills
Questions: 15 (Q1 – Q15)Time: 15 Minutes

This section examines the analytical and logical thinking abilities of a candidate. No specialised knowledge of any particular field is required for answering the questions, and no knowledge of the terminology and conventions of formal logic is presupposed.

In these questions you are to analyse the situation on which each question is based, and then select the answer that is the most appropriate response to the question.

Each question or group of questions is based on a passage or set of conditions. In answering some of the questions, it may be useful to draw a rough diagram. For each question, select the best answer from the choices given. Darken the corresponding oval in the answer sheet.

Questions 1 – 5

The production manager of a reputed theatre group is planning a schedule of productions for the group’s five-week summer festival. Two different plays will be scheduled for each of the five weeks. The ten plays that will be scheduled are four plays by playwright K, two plays by playwright L, two plays by playwright M, one play by playwright N, one play by playwright O. The scheduling is subject to the following restrictions:

  • No two plays by the same playwright will be staged for any of the five-week schedule, except for week 3 in which two plays by playwright K will be staged.
  • The play by playwright O will be scheduled in week 5.
  • No play by playwright L will be staged in the same week as any play by playwright K.

1 Which of the following could be the two plays scheduled for week 1 ?
  1. The play by playwright N and the play by playwright O.
  2. A play by playwright K and the play by playwright N.
  3. A play by playwright K and play by playwright L.
  4. Two plays by playwright L.
2 If the plays by playwright M will be scheduled for two consecutive weeks, which of the following must be true ?
  1. A play by playwright K and a play by playwright M will both be scheduled for the same week.
  2. A play by playwright M will be scheduled for week 5.
  3. A play by playwright L will be scheduled for week 4.
  4. The play by playwright N will be scheduled for week 2.
3 If a play by playwright L and the play by playwright N will both be scheduled for the same week, which of the following must be true ?
  1. The plays by playwright L will be scheduled for weeks 4 and 5.
  2. The plays by playwright M will be scheduled for weeks 1 and 2.
  3. The plays by playwright M will be scheduled for weeks 4 and 5.
  4. The plays by playwright L will be scheduled for weeks 1 and 2.
4 Which of the following pairs of plays CANNOT be scheduled together for any week ?
  1. A play by playwright K and the play by playwright N.
  2. A play by playwright L and the play by playwright N.
  3. A play by playwright L and a play by playwright M.
  4. A play by playwright M and the play by playwright N.
5 If the plays by playwright L will be scheduled for weeks 1 and 2, which of the following must be true ?
  1. The play by playwright N will be scheduled for week 4.
  2. A play by playwright M will be scheduled for week 5.
  3. A play by playwright K will be scheduled for week 4.
  4. A play by playwright M will be scheduled for week 1.

 

Q 6 - 10: This set of questions is based on a proposition or a sentence or a passage. Each proposition / sentence / passage represents an argument, which consists of several parts such as an assumption, a conclusion, an inference, a premise, etc. These terms are defined as follows:

Argument : an argument is any group of propositions of which one is claimed to follow from others, which are regarded as providing support or grounds for truth of that one ?
Assumption : an assumption is an unstated and/or implied premise that supports the conclusion.
Conclusion :the conclusion of an argument is the proposition that is affirmed on the basis of other proposition (s) of the argument, or a conclusion is a claim, the main point of an argument.
Inference :the inference refers to the process by which one proposition is arrived at and affirmed on the basis of one or more propositions accepted as the starting point of the process; it is synonymously used as a conclusion.
Premise :a premise is a stated reason or a piece of evidence, facts, examples that support (s) the conclusion or inference.

In this part an argument passage, a quotation from classics, an excerpt from well known author (s), or a passage, is followed by questions which is/are statement (s) reproduced from the argument passage. These questions are concerned with the parts of an argument as defined above, i.e., assumption, conclusion, inference, premise, etc.

Identify if the statement given in the question, is an assumption, a conclusion, a premise, or none of these. Choose the number as indicated below:

Choose 1 - if the statement is an assumption.
Choose 2 - if the statement is a conclusion.
Choose 3 - if the statement is a premise.
Choose 4 - if the statement is none of these, i.e., assumption, conclusion or premise.

Darken the oval in the answer sheet that matches with your choice corresponding to each question.

Q 6 - 10 are based on the following passage:
Passage
………... almost every advertisement you see is obviously designed, in someway or another, to fool the customer: the point that they don't want you to read is small; the statements are written in an obscure way. It is obvious to anybody that the product is not being presented in a scientific and balanced way. Therefore, in the selling business, there is a lack of integrity.
Direction for Questions 6 - 10: Identify the part of argument and choose 1,2,3, or 4 and darken the corresponding oval in the answer sheet.
6 Almost every advertisement you see is obviously designed, in some way or another, to fool the customer.
7 The point that they don't want you to read is small.
8 The statements are written in an obscure way
9 It is obvious to anybody that the product is not being presented in a scientific and balanced way.
10 In the selling business, there is a lack of integrity.

 

Directions for Questions 11 - 12 : Two statements for each question, marked (A) and (B), followed by two conclusions, marked I and II, that can be logically drawn from the above two statements (A) and (B). Even if the statements vary from well known facts assume them to be true, then choose the best answer from the alternatives given below, and darken the corresponding oval in the answer sheet;

Choose 1 - if only conclusion I follows.
Choose 2 - if only conclusion II follows.
Choose 3 - if both I and II follow.
Choose 4 - if neither I nor II follows.

11 Statements:

(A). Some crazy people are pianists.
(B). All crazy people are whistlers.

Conclusions:

I. Some whistlers are pianists.
II. All whistlers are crazy.

12 Statements:

(A). No diamond is Quartz.
(B). No opal is Quartz.

Conclusions:

I. Diamonds are opals.
II. No opal is a diamond.

 

Directions for Questions 13 - 15:

Below you will find few statements or a set of statements followed by 3 or 4 figures. Each figure is drawn as three overlapping circles (Venn diagram) describing the probable relationship among the three class of objects, things, groups, persons, etc., stated in the statements (s). Each circle represents each class of objects, things, groups, persons, etc., indicated by CAPITALIZED initials shown in the parenthesis in the statements (s). Venn diagrams (or set diagrams) here are the diagramatic representation of sets and set operations. You will also find here the symbols/expressions/figures denoting the basic (i.e., standard) operations of sets such as union, intersection, compliment of a set. Union (or join) of two or more sets means - it contains all the elements (or members) of the sets (say A and B) avoiding duplication and is denoted as A B i.e., "A union B". The second basic operation i.e., intersection (or meet) of two or more sets means all the elements/members that belong to (i.e., common) both/all the sets for instance, A B is read as "A intersection B". The compliment of a set denotes (Ac) those elements/members which do not belong to the set A. In the figure, the un-shaded part means that class or sub-class or sub-set is empty or there is no member in that class or sub-class set, i.e., a null set.

In particular, the following Venn diagrams and/or expressions illustrate the probable relationship between any two sets or class:

indicates there is a no A which is B, or there is no member which belongs to both sets; it also indicates that set B is an empty set or A B = A - B
indicates there is no common member between the sets A and B or A n B is an empty set.
indicates that there is no empty set; the figure represents (a) some A is not B i.e., A Bc, (b) some A is B and vice-versa i.e., A B, and (c) some B is not A i.e., Ac B.
Questions 13 - 15: For each set of statement (s) 3 or 4 Venn diagrams or expressions using set symbols are given. Choose the diagram/set-expression that describes the probable relationship among the class of objects, things, etc., and darken the oval corresponding to your answer-choice in the answer sheet.
13 No weakings (W) are labour leaders, (L), because no weakings are true liberals (T), and all labour leaders are true liberals.
1.2.
3.4.None of these
 
14 Some reformers (R) are fanatics (F) some idealists (I) are fanatics, since all reformers are idealists.
1.2.
3.4.
15 All great scientists(s) are college graduates (G), therefore some professional athletes (A) are great scientists, since some professional athletes are college graduates.
1.2.
3.4. S - (A n G)
 

 

 

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